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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
in brazil. >> let me make it clear, the policy of the united states of america with respect to all settlements is that they are illegitimate. and we oppose settlements taking place at any time, not just the time of the... of the peace process. >> reporter: in a separate move, israel carried out a promise that led to the peace negotiations by releasing 26 palestinian prisoners. buses left a prison in central israel after nightfall. the inmates had been held on charges ranging from rock- throwing to deadly bombings. the israeli military shot down a rocket launched at a resort town near the egyptian border today. the attack targeted eilat on the red sea. officials said it's the first time israel's iron dome defense system had intercepted a rocket there. militants based in egypt's sinai peninsula claimed responsibility for the attack. another apparent u.s. drone strike in yemen killed two more militants late monday. it brings to 37 the number believed killed in the last two weeks amid warnings al qaeda in the arabian peninsula was planning attacks in the region. the group is considered
jazeera america. good evening. newt gingrich today came out and said the republican party has to be less vicious and negative. newt gingrich called other republicans vicious and negative, and somewhere, an angel coughed up blood. also, rick perry is going to run for president again, the man who thought arab spring was a saudi death rant. i'll give a list of every democratic that demanded to see the birth certificate. >> 48 years ago tonight, the balesles in vented legendary rock at shea stadium. 44 years ago, the woodstock music festival opened and tonight, we present to you the final hour of original programming produced for current t.v. it has been my privilege to host this show. this evening, we say goodbye with roseanne barr, lewis black, heroic activate and new town survivor erika laughty. i am john fugelsang, this is and has been viewpoint. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ theme >> sit down. sit down! good evening, i'm john fugelsang, this is viewpoint. on this show, i get to say what i want to say, and how i want to say it. that is rare in t.v. i thank current and the guys at al jazeer
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
. it is a struggle of a lifetime. to redeem the soul of america. we still need to find a way to humanize our political institution, our businesses, and our system of education. 50 years later, those of us educated to the full -- calls of justice, need to appease ourselves. our struggle is an ongoing struggle. there will be progress. there will also be setbacks. we must continue to have hope and be still in our faith that this nation will become a truly multiracial democracy. we must continue to work. we must not give up or give in. keep the faith. and people hurting and suffering, we must be ready to take action, cast our votes, and move our feet. we must have a sense of urgency to use the power rented us to help end human suffering. we as a people and a congress understand our differences do not divide us. we will be at our best when we accept that we are one people, one american family, that we all live in the same house. the american house, the world house. understand that no one, but no one, is breathless. everyone can make a contribution. the march on washington is saying to us today th
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
to be the least aggrieved black man in america to be palatable to the wider electorate and that's what he did in 2008. we're now in 2013. he's been elected twice. it's the 50th anniversary. i don't see how he can speak without dealing directly with the issue of race without going there today. and then doing something else. not only talking about the issues that we kind of know how to address and know how to solve, vote rights, for example, we see was happening, we know how to organize. we know how to fight that. we have the tools and the laws in place to fight that. there are other things that are more complicated and more difficult to work on. the patterns of residential segregation that have led to schools in many parts of the country being segregated now as they were in 1970s or 1960s. that sort of thing is much more diffuse, much more complicated and that's what i hope i hear more about today not just from the president, but from other speakers as well. >> chris, to you gene's points the question of segregation in american society would seem to be settled but it's not you look at the stat
#mymarchdc. we want to hear your stories. >> it appears america is still not color blind. new study by tpeer research center, among blacks, jumps to 79% african-americans lag behind many whites 14% margin, 7 in 10 blacks are treated less fairly by police and courts. also this morning 50 years ago, voting rights a huge issue and remain so today. federal government suing state of texas over new id law which is discriminatory. >> texas is the only state that is discriminating in redistricting. in june, supreme court ruled to remove the -- to seek pre-clearance from the department of justice before making changes to election and redistricting laws. justice department is using a different part of the act in the texas case. now to the violent death of a community activist in d.c. >> police say someone shot timothy dawkins where he lived. the 24 year old studied to become a preacher. he had plans to run for ant commission e commissioner. >> he had an old soul. we traveled with kids to tennessee for training. we more examples especially black men. we lost out here. >> police don't have a suspect or
, and what i often call apartheid in the southern part of the united states of america. so if you look at was going on from 1876 to 1895, in that 20 year period we saw the beginning of the end of full citizenship of african-americans in this country. so by the time robert smalls died in 1950, he died brokenhearted, and financially, not near as well off as he once was. and so i have spent a lot of time talking about the history of this. as i used to say to my students when i taught, if it happened before it can happen again. and we see all the speculation about what the supreme court is going to do with the most important civil rights act, which i think was the voting rights act of 1965. and most experts think that that's about to come to a significant, and i call, a noble end. oh grams of affirmative action, that simply means you're going to take positive steps. you can't be passive. you've got to take positive steps to overcome the current effects of past discrimination, the history. not going to happen by itself. if you bring that to a close, and people are speculating that that is a
of america merrill lynch. we will grow by 8.2% this year, beating china for the fifth straight year. the energy front, our oil production has increased by 50% since 2005. iraq a expects to increase oil production to 4.5 million barrels by the end of 2014 and 9 million barrels a day by 2020. as the international energy agency has reported, iraq is poised to double our export of oil by the decade of 2015. -- of 2050. we will use our strained global oil markets. in spite of this progress, we have challenges that we are working to address. 90% of our economy depends on oil. unemployment rate is 11%, our poverty line rate is 23%. although there has been significant progress over the last few years, and we think the development millennium goals set by the united nations. in order to diversify our economy beyond energy, iraq is investing oil revenues in education and crucial development projects, including restoration of power and rebuilding our transportation system. our economy will benefit from our progress on the germanic front as well. last month, the united nations security council r
're black or white, latino, asian america or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people -- >> the actual anniversary is wednesday, that is when president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial along with former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. close tore home, hundreds of people marched in san jose, they walked about a mile to the county building shouting, slogans and drumming. there was one woman who marched in washington 50 years ago and sat in her view there has been significant progress that more needs to be done. still ahead this morning what san francisco has to do to live up to the i have a dream speech. >>> on the action san francisco may take against nevada for dumping mentally ill patients in california. surfers and swimmers banned because of a shark. >> the weather department much more tranquil we're looking for a pleasant area once we dispense look at the nation's midsection. they're heating up and they're cooling down, good forecast for you after a break. ,,,, bay area headlines... stins beach is re-opening t
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
. lots in california. >> happiest cities in america. >> on the west coast. i know green bay, wisconsin, made that list. >> it did. we were all surprised about hi. my name is cj. a few years ago, my father became seriously ill. i did what i could do before he passed, but it took its toll. i lost my job, my house. i'm getting back on my feet, but i don't know when there'll be food on the table. how'd i do, cj? we could be twins. well, cousins maybe. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- terror fears. new details about a threat that has forced the u.s. to close embassies overseas all week and strengthen security here at home. >> plot to kill. the ugly accusations and allegations against an attractive college co-ed. police and prosecutors say a 21-year-old student was out for some lethal revenge against two ex-boyfriends. >> getting bullish, not in spain but in the u.s. coming to the cities coast to coast. why the events are so controversial and why some people cannot wait to run for t
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
worse. the pace of decline of america's middle class has actually speeded up in the obama years. median income down 4.4% since june of '09. >> so he accelerated income ee quality. >> he increased it. we're going to watch varney and company on friday. the friday edition is always the best and often ends in song. >> it is? >> yes. >> there's a promo. >> thanks, everyone. >>> this guy says black people can't survive unless a lot of whites are killed. and guess what? he works for the department of homeland security. so why hasn't he been fired? a former department of justice employee says he knows and he's going to join us next. >>> and barely even back to school, just beginning to look like christmas at some stores. what the heck is happening? we'll tell you why this year is different and starting much earlier. >> oh, no. ♪ so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up... ♪ [ female announcer ] when your swapportunity comes, take it. ♪ what? what? what? [ female announcer ] yoplait. it is so good. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, what? what? relief is at han
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
notorious criminals. the fbi's ten most wanted list, has chronicled america's infamous from james earl ray to tud bundy and the centennial bomber. accused murderers, drug traffickers and child parnographers. >> most of these folks have commit more than one very serious crime, rapes and murders, these are very dangerous people. >> ron hoska, who runs the ten most wanted program, is responsible for finding these people. >> 500 criminals have made the list in his 63-year history and 470 cases have been cleared. >> not all those are by arrest. some are in custody, some turned up dead, but 94% clearance rate is a tremendously successful program. but it's the other 6% that keep him and his agents up at night. >> a wiley fugitive who drops under the horizon can present a significant challenge to us. >> and even amid the top ten list of criminality, the story of one wiley fugitive stands out. you might know him and not even realize it. he could live across town, down the block, or maybe even closer. and if you know where to find him, the fbi could make it worth your while. this fugitive's catch me
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)